Monday, August 10, 2015

"GODS", "ALIENS", and "MULTI-VERSES"

Confusion on people's views stems a lot on definitions. Using different definitions of labels causes confusion. Using different definitions of what it is we're supposed to be contemplating the existence of also causes much confusion.

So, what do I mean by "gods"? 

The starting point for almost all concepts of "gods", has one or more intelligent beings who exists beyond our known universe (beyond, because our known universe doesn't exist at the beginning of almost every creation story). That starting point is the bare bones concept of "god", described by deism. Deism (root "deos") is just Latin for Theism (root "theos"), so I consider it to be the most basic form of theism, without all the specific religions' or mythologies' attachments. This is somewhat similar to our concept of "aliens" as just some kind of intelligent beings who exist beyond our planet, or even solar system. 

To write an "alien" science fiction story, and prior to giving the beings descriptions, attributes, powers, etc., one would first have to have the bare bones "aliens" concept in their head. I apply the same principal to "gods". To write a "gods" fantasy story, and prior to giving the beings descriptions, attributes, powers, etc., one would first have to have the bare bones "gods" concept in their head.

I look upon the Bible and a Superman comic, in a similar light. If someone thinks the Bible is evidence of "gods" existing, I consider that as logical as someone thinking a Superman comic is evidence of "aliens" existing. On the flip side, if someone thinks they can scientifically show that "gods" or "aliens" don't exist with a copy of the Bible or Superman, then I think they are being quite illogical, as well. 

An added aspect to religious writings are claims of personal experiences. Unlike Superman, this is equivalent to people claiming to have personal "alien" experiences. That part of the equation leads to a chicken and egg question. Which came first, the concept of "aliens", or claims of "alien" experiences? Which came first, the concept of "gods", or claims of "god" experiences? With regards to "aliens", it seems that the concept came first. 

Does evidence suggest there are no other intelligent "alien" beings in the known universe, outside of planet Earth? No. The universe is vast, and we have barely begun to actually explore it. Then how can someone say there is evidence to suggest that no intelligent "god" beings exist in the known universe, outside of planet Earth? 

If we add the concept of "multi-verses", does evidence suggest there are no other individual universes existing beyond our known universe? No. We still haven't come to a consensus on whether, or not, there is a single-verse or there are multi-verses. Then how can someone say there is evidence to suggest "god" beings do, or don't, exist beyond our known universe? 

The first step in trying to scientifically disprove the existence of a Bible, Torah, Qur'an, etc., "God", is to accept that it's some kind of valid evidence, in the first place, that you can test and falsify. Again, that seems, to me, like accepting that a Superman comic is valid evidence for "Superman", that you can test and falsify. That sounds like pseudo-science. 

Added to the "gods" concept is that the "gods" then bring forth our known universe. Where they supposedly exist, though, is answered by where they are said to exist, before that happens.

The question then is, if creating universes is an ability that can't be separated from the concept of "gods", is creating universes possible? According to theoretical physicists, that answer is "yes". 






If we did create a universe, we would, by definition, be deistic "gods". There would also exist a universe potentially filled with trillions upon trillions of beings considering us "gods" and speculating as to whether we're "good" or "evil", what we look like, what abilities we have, etc., and maybe even having personal experiences that some of them think our interactions with us. They might write stories, based on those speculations and experiences.

The ironic part would be that, if we couldn't interact with our creation, we would be speculating about what exists within it, if anything (we could do a shit job and the whole thing could just explode into nothingness without our even knowing it), as much as they are speculating what exists beyond it, if anything.